Mobile Health MOT featured in Oxford Mail

26th September 2017

Mobile Health MOT were featured in the business section of The Oxford Mail.

September 21 2017 – Article as follows:

 


 

Nurses from Witney-based firm are bossing it with their workplace health MOTs

WE take our cars for a regular MOT, so why not have ourselves checked out?

That’s the idea behind a Witney-based firm, which offers mobile health screening.

Mobile Health MOT goes into offices, factories and workplaces around the county.

Once on site, its team of qualified nurses measure blood pressure and cholesterol levels and check for diabetes with a finger-prick test.

They also give advice on heart disease risk and raise awareness of cancers and other illness.

Nurse and Mobile Health MOT founder Colin Nicholson said: “Each confidential health check takes about 20 minutes.

“We weigh, measure and take essential screenings like blood pressure and cholesterol for each staff member.”

Among the firm’s clients is family-owned Carterton garage Oakey Automotive Services.

Managing director Holly Oakey said: “Working in a potentially hazardous environment, like a busy car garage, raises the issue of staff wellbeing.

“We take health and safety seriously, so wanted to ensure that our staff are safe and sound in body and mind.”

Her father, garage owner Trevor Oakey, added: “After they did the basic tests, Colin spent further time with us all consulting about diet and fitness.

“It was really informative and great to talk about health outside of having to visit the doctor.

The firm, which has 20 clients, has a team of four nurses.

It also holds evening clinics for employers whose staff can’t make it to a GP surgery during the daytime.

Mr Nicholson said workplace sessions, which cost from £40 per person, are good for staff morale, help cut down time taken off for sickness and can even be life-saving.

During a routine workplace health screening last year, Mr Nicholson met a young employee who appeared to be in good health, apart from suffering from on-off headaches.

Mr Nicholson recalled: “During the check-up we chatted through these headaches.

“I checked his blood pressure, as well as his cholesterol level, which came back on the high side, so we advised he should see his GP within the next few days.”

After seeing a doctor and having tests, the employee was sent on to the hospital for an MRI scan, which discovered a benign cyst about the size of a golf ball on his brain.

Further CT scans showed he also had tumours on both kidneys, three of which were cancerous.

Mr Nicholson said “The patient had admitted that he was the type of man that wouldn’t usually go and see a doctor for a headache and he‘s not the only one.

“His work-place health screening literally saved his life.”